Videos

Randox Food Diagnostics - Increasing global consumer confidence, by improving food safety

Randox Food Diagnostics has recently produced a new video ‘Increasing global consumer confidence by improving food safety’. 

Randox Food Diagnostics - Increasing global consumer confidence, by improving food safety

Randox Food Diagnostics has recently produced this new corporate video on ‘Increasing global consumer confidence by improving food safety’. 

UK scientist receives global honour at 17th Annual L’ORÉAL-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards.

For 17 years, women in the science industry have been celebrated for their incredible efforts and contributions to the research field, from curing diseases to protecting the environment, at the annual L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards.

This year, Professor Dame Carol Robinson has been awarded the European Laureate award, making her the fifth British scientist to have won the European award in the 17 years of the programme's existence.

Working in physical chemistry with the mass spectrometer, Professor Robinson is being honoured both for creating a revolutionary method for protein function study, membrane proteins in particular, and establishing a whole new scientific field: gas phase structural biology. Her pioneering work could have a significant impact on the field of medical research in the coming years.

In this video Professor Robinson shares her inspiring journey into science and the challenges women in the scientific industry face. She also details how the For Women In Science programme supports future generations of women entering scientific vocations, and what it means to be awarded the European Laureate award.

Freeman Technology - An Introduction to Powders Video

Within the pharmaceutical industry the replacement of batch tablet production units with continuous manufacturing suites has the potential to significantly improve efficiency and reduce costs. Freeman Technology, a leader in powder testing instrumentation, and GEA, a specialist provider of pharmaceutical processing equipment, are combining their expertise to advance understanding in this area. A primary focus is to identify metrics that provide a sound basis for the effective control of continuous manufacturing processes. For more, click HERE.

Harald Haas: Wireless data from every light bulb

What if every light bulb in the world could also transmit data? At TEDGlobal, Harald Haas demonstrates, for the first time, a device that could do exactly that. By flickering the light from a single LED, a change too quick for the human eye to detect, he can transmit far more data than a cellular tower -- and do it in a way that's more efficient, secure and widespread.

Prof. Harald Haas - My Li-Fi Revolution

"My LiFi revolution". In the 2014 Tam Dalyell Lecture, Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communications at The University of Edinburgh, reveals an amazing innovation that could change wireless communications forever. 

The LiFi system uses standard light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to transmit electronic data signals, which will enable users to access the internet through the ordinary lighting systems in schools, workplaces and homes. This revolutionary invention has the potential to bring cheap, energy efficient and super-secure wireless access to the world.

Visible Light Communications @EuCNC 2014

Harald Haas from the University of Edinburgh discusses visible light communications.

 

BMP21-LAB Portable Label Printer

The BMP 21-LAB Portable Label Printer is an all-in-one labeller for research, academic and clinical labs. 

With label materials designed specifically for harsh environments, the BMP21-LAB printer can quickly and easily create legible labels for flat, curved or highly textured surfaces that stay stuck for years even when exposed to extreme temperatures and chemicals.

Brady FreezerBondz Laboratory Labels - Testimonial

FreezerBondz material is a low-profile label used on frozen surfaces or on room-temperature surfaces that will eventually be stored in liquid nitrogen (-196°C).

Crystal with the BloodCenter of Wisconsin texplains about how they test lab specimens and some of the challenges they face in specimen identification.

She explains how they use a barcode system and why they chose Brady FreezerBondz labels to ensure that their specimens are properly identified for tracking. 

TGAC Understanding Life on Earth

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) uses Intel-powered super computers to collect and crunch complex data that is shaping the future of science.

Tackling problems like population growth and securing food supply are what TGAC aims to contribute towards. Having a supercomputer that keeps up with the vast level of data delivered is crucial. The Institute’s research output requires a significant amount of computing power to handle the hundreds of samples and millions of sequences analysed every day. In the human genome alone, there are three billion letters of DNA. At TGAC these super computers are used to categorise, process, and analyse the genome sequences of a diverse range of plants, animals, and microbes.

Five times larger than the human genome, TGAC have used their high-performance computing (HPC) capabilities to sequence and assemble one of the most complex genomes, the bread wheat genome. Their scientists have already sequenced and assembled 17 of the 21 chromosomes of the genome, by applying the Intel technology-powered SGI UV system.

The third most-produced cereal worldwide, bread wheat has over a 100,000 genes, compared to the human genome containing about 20,000, the sheer size of the genome, as well as the activation and relationship between the genes and tissue determine its vast complexity.

The Bioinformatics teams at TGAC use the SGI UV2000 high-performance computing (HPC) system, the largest SGI-UV installation in the UK. Powered by the Intel Xeon processor E5-4650L product family, the system enables the scientists to analyse the genome sequences of crops, animals, and microbes to promote a sustainable bioeconomy and aid global food security.

Tim Stitt, Head of Computing at The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), said: "Intel are renowned for engineering innovative and leading-edge hardware and software solutions for scientific computing and without their technology our rate of discovery at TGAC would be much less. We are delighted to count on them as a valuable partner in our mission to advance the forefront of Bioscience.”

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