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Cancer panels enable sequencing of difficult genes

New SureSeq myPanel NGS Custom Cancer Panel content covers a wider range of cancer types with excellent coverage uniformity for confident results



Functions of 150 genes discovered

Major European mouse study reveals the role of genes in disease



Towards an expression atlas for an entire brain

Thousands of genes can now be examined at once via new techniques



Genes increase stress of social disadvantage for some children

The study uses telomere length as a marker of stress



Mother’s genes work with baby’s to prevent obesity

Scientists uncover how copies of a gene present in both mother and baby interact to control optimal growth of the child



Potential new drug target for cystic fibrosis

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg and Regensburg University, both in Germany, and the University of Lisboa, in Portugal, have discovered a promising potential drug target for cystic fibrosis.



The future of UK life science research

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), provider of innovative genetics research and biomarker solutions to advance molecular medicine, is proud to announce the achievements of placement student David Blaney.



Almac secures new metagenomics and enzyme discovery programme with UCL

The BBRSC programme combines chemistry and biochemical engineering at UCL with Almac’s biocatalysis group



Genes may travel from plant to plant to fuel evolution

Evolutionary biologists at the University of Sheffield and Brown University have documented for the first time that plants pass genes from plant to plant to fuel their evolutionary development.



Gene may worsen cancer outcome by speeding metabolism of drugs

The gene, called CYP3A7, is normally only active in infancy, but in some people it continues to be switched on into adulthood



Movement in the womb sparks specific genes to build a healthy skeleton

Study highlights more than 1,000 genes that respond to movement, which could help programme cells to grow bone and cartilage for regenerative therapies.



Genetic mutation could increase understanding of ADHD

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have discovered that a mutation in a single gene involved in the functioning of the brain’s nervous system can lead to hyperactivity symptoms that are characteristic of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).



Impact of gene on crop development could boost cereal yields

The productivity of major crops such as barley could get a boost in the future thanks to discoveries in the inner workings of genes and how they influence crop development, a new study from the James Hutton Institute and the University of Dundee has shown.



Integrated DNA Technologies enhances its qPCR probe portfolio

Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), the world leader in oligonucleotide synthesis, has further expanded its portfolio of PrimeTime qPCR products with the launch of two new probes.



Understanding the effects of genes on human traits

Recent technological developments in genomics have revealed a large number of genetic influences on common complex diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, cancer or schizophrenia.



Genetic mutation causes obesity

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Boston Children’s Hospital have discovered a genetic cause of severe obesity which, although rare, raises new questions about weight gain and energy use.



Exotic fish study sheds light on how our nerves protect themselves

Fresh insights gained from a study of tropical fish could help our understanding of how the nervous system works.



Why jumping genes don’t send us into meltdown

A team of researchers, led by academics at The University of Nottingham, has explained why the so-called ‘jumping genes’ found in most living organisms don’t ultimately kill off their hosts, putting an end to a long-standing scientific mystery.



New strategy for defeating neuroblastoma

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a promising strategy for defeating neuroblastoma – a malignant form of cancer in children – that focuses on the so-called MYCN protein.



‘Junk DNA’ plays active role in cancer progression

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have found that a genetic rogue element produced by sequences until recently considered ‘junk DNA’ could promote cancer progression.



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