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Using nuclear magnetic resonance to test fat content

A contract laboratory dramatically increased sample throughput using nuclear resonance technology



Potato research tackles starch content and pests

New research projects aim to modify potato starch content to improve nutritional benefits and to reduce the effect of the crop's major pathogenic threat. Sean Ottewell reports



Fortifying foods and reducing fat content

Adams Food Ingredients Limited, the functional ingredients division of The Irish Dairy Board, has launched a range of additives to help food manufacturers enhance the health and nutritional values of their products.



Flavanol antioxidant content of chocolate

A recent study confirms that the antioxidants and other plant-based nutrients in chocolate and cocoa products are highly associated with the amount of non-fat cocoa-derived ingredients in the product.



Automated stem cell high content screening platform

Researchers at I-STEM have used a BioCel 1800 platform to automate high content screening of small molecules for muscular dystrophy therapeutic research.



Moisture content determination in samples

The TitraLab580 monoburette and TitraLab585 biburette Karl Fischer Titration Workstations provide efficient moisture content determination in quality control samples.



Analysis helps to determine water content in hair samples

Jonathan Bruce looks at a technique developed for the analysis of water in hair.



Analysis of moisture content is critical to ensuring material quality

Moisture content analysis is a critical component of material quality and essentially a function of quality control in most production and laboratory facilities. From biological research organisations, pharmaceutical manufacturers, to food producers and packers, moisture content control greatly influences the physical properties and product quality of nearly all substances and materials at all stages of processing and final product existence. Paul Wesolowski reports.



Comparison of NIRS techniques to determine caffeine content in tea

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an analytical tool that is used in many different fields, and many applications have already been described in the areas of agriculture, foodstuffs, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Here, Angela Schmidt, Brian P Davies, Dr Grit Schulzki, and Dr Andrea Giehl describe how NIRS used to monitor caffeine levels in tea.



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