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How do cells decide how to repair their DNA?

Going fishing in the protein pond using histones as a bait – how do cells decide how to repair their DNA?



Sensing how cells respond to mechanical stimuli

The Catholic University of Rome uses the JPK NanoWizard AFM & CellHesion systems



Optical sensor measures oxygen in cells and tissues

For the first time, extra and intracellular O2 concentrations in cells and tissues can be quickly determined



Device for removal of dying and dead cells

ClioCell has the ability to selectively remove inhibitory or toxic dead cells using a simple and rapid procedure results in radically improved cell populations



LIFTSYS prototype machine for transferring biomaterials

At the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, an interdisciplinary team of researchers is working on a method for transferring biomaterials and on innovative systems technology.



Cell Metric CLDTM success in US biopharma for single cell cloning

Due to the significant time saving advantages of their Cell MetricTM systems, Solentim, the market-leading developer of innovative tools for shortening steps in the upstream cell line development workflow, have had their best quarter of sales revenues to date.



Cancer cells can shrug off physical constraints on growth and spread

Scientists find cancer cells that spread around the body have a broken switch which continually activates a key molecule called YAP



Cell insight offers clues on biological processes linked to fertility

Scientists studying how healthy cells are formed have made a discovery that could aid understanding of how infertility, stillbirths and birth defects arise



Molecular switch controls the destiny of self-eating cells

In a new paper published in the journal Nature, researchers present a previously unknown mechanism that controls whether a cell survives autophagy, a process that can be compared to the cell consuming parts of itself.



New approach solves large molecular puzzles

Scientists at European Molecular Biology Laboratory have used super-resolution microscopy to solve a decade-long debate about the structure of the nuclear pore complex, which controls access to the genome by acting as a gate into the cell’s nucleus.



Molecular discovery puts cancer treatment in a new perspective

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the National Institutes of Health have obtained ground-breaking new knowledge about proteases - important enzymes which, among other things, play a role in the development of cancer cells.



Pioneering mouse research provides breakthrough in the search for adult brain stem cells

Generating new cells in the brain that regulate core body functions has moved one step closer as a result of state-of-the-art research at one of the UK's flagship research centres at the University of Sheffield.



EU urged to increase investment in human-relevant testing tools for chemicals, cosmetics, medicines

Consortium including Dow, DuPont, ExxonMobil, Johnson & Johnson, L’Oréal, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, animal NGOs and academia issue statement



Dental pulp stem cells transformed by ‘bad breath’ chemical

Japanese scientists have found that the odorous compound responsible for halitosis - otherwise known as bad breath - is ideal for harvesting stem cells taken from human dental pulp.



Nerve cells grow on nanocellulose

Researchers from Chalmers and the University of Gothenburg have shown that nanocellulose stimulates the formation of neural networks. This is the first step toward creating a three-dimensional model of the brain.



Exercise changes the genetic identity of your muscle cells

New research may change the way we view our DNA and its ability to change. This could not only help improve the benefits of exercising, but also combat cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.



Cambridge team first to grow smooth muscle cells from patient skin cells

A Cambridge University research team has for the first time discovered a method of generating different types of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) - the cells which make up the walls of blood vessels - using cells from patients' skin. This work could lead to new treatments and better screening for cardiovascular disease.



Freeze drying of human red blood cells

SP Scientific has announced a new LyoLearn webinar entitled 'Freeze Drying of Human Blood Cells'



Moving images of live cells at super-resolution in three dimensions

New technology will accelerate scientists’ understanding of disease mechanisms at the molecular level



Tester senses stress and stretch in individual cells

Enhancing fundamental research to understand heart muscle and blood pressure regulation



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