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Alzheimer's drug fails to reduce significant agitation

A drug prescribed for Alzheimer’s disease does not ease clinically significant agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Gothenburg Team prepares for uterine transplantation

Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, are planning to conduct uterus transplants between mother and daughter. The Regional Research Ethics Committee has now given its approval and in the autumn, ten patients have...

FANCM plays key role in inheritance

Scientists of KIT and the University of Birmingham have identified relevant new functions of a gene that plays a crucial role in Fanconi...

Heavy new arguments weigh in on the danger of obesity

A true obesity epidemic is gradually advancing throughout the developed world. A large new Danish-British study from the University of Copenhagen and University of Bristol documents for the first time a definite correlation between a high...

Delirium mouse model helps researchers understand the condition’s causes

A new mouse model of delirium developed by Wellcome Trust researchers has provided an important insight into the mechanisms underlying the condition, bringing together two theories as to its causes. Details of the research are published in...

Darwinian selection continues to influence human evolution

New evidence proves humans are continuing to evolve and that significant natural and sexual selection is still taking place in our species in the modern world. Despite advancements in medicine and technology, as well as an increased...

Bridging the gap in treatment for older women with breast cancer

Sheffield researchers are investigating ways to improve the treatment and survival rate of elderly patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

Laparoscopy reduces the risk of small-bowel obstruction

Open surgery appears to be associated with an increased risk of small-bowel obstructions compared to laparoscopic procedures. This is shown by a new study at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

New drug to tackle fat problems

Medical researchers at the University of Sheffield have defined the structure of a key part of the human obesity receptor- an essential factor in the regulation of body fat- which could help provide new treatments for the complications of...

Blood cell breakthrough could help treat heart disease

Scientists at the University of Reading have made a groundbreaking discovery into the way blood clots are formed, potentially leading to the development of new drugs to treat one of the world’s biggest killer illness.

Xenotransplantation as a therapy for type 1 diabetes

A research team has generated a genetically modified strain of pigs whose beta-cells restores glucose homeostasis and inhibit human-anti-pig immune reaction.

Brain network reveals disorders

Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich identify a new method of unerringly detecting the presence of pathophysiological...

New technique may help severely damaged nerves regrow and restore function

Engineers at the University of Sheffield have developed a method of assisting nerves damaged by traumatic accidents to repair naturally,...

Leeches are DNA bloodhounds in the jungle

Copenhagen Zoo and University of Copenhagen have in collaboration developed a new and revolutionary, yet simple and cheap, method for tracking mammals in the rainforests of Southeast Asia. They collect leeches from tropical jungles, which...

Bayer HealthCare announces a new blood glucose monitoring system

Bayer HealthCare introduces Contour® XT blood glucose meter and Contour® NEXT test strips with next generation testing technology to help people with diabetes get quick and accurate results

New ways to treat debilitating brittle bone disease

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered new ways to help detect and treat the debilitating brittle bone disease...

Ravens remember relationships they had with others

In daily life we remember faces and voices of several known individuals. Similarly, mammals have been shown to remember calls and faces of...

Pollen levels are rising across Europe

From Reykjavik to Thessaloniki, pollen levels are on the increase. A team of researchers headed by Prof. Annette Menzel at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen reports that pollen counts have already risen across Europe in recent years.

Fatty acids fight cancer spread

Tiny agents found in omega-3 could potentially be used to block the path of primary cancer tumors, preventing the advance to secondary stage cancers according to pharmacy researchers at the University of Sydney.

Biomarker family found for chemo resistant breast cancers

Biomarkers which could help to predict resistance to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients have been identified by researchers from the University of Hull.

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